Chelsea Manning posts new image of herself day after release from prison

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Army Pvt. Chelsea Manning posted a new image of herself after being freed from a Kansas military prison and a 35-year sentence for leaking classified materials.

The transgender soldier formerly known as Bradley Manning took to Twitter and Instagram on Thursday, posting a portrait photograph of her with short-cropped hair, bright red lipstick and a dark outfit with a plunging neckline.

The 29-year-old Oklahoma native included the caption, "Okay, so here I am everyone!!"

Okay, so here I am everyone!! 😜 . . #HelloWorld

A post shared by Chelsea E. Manning (@xychelsea87) on

Manning was released early Wednesday from confinement at Kansas' Fort Leavenworth, after having served seven years behind bars for giving classified materials to anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

Manning and her attorneys have refused to divulge her post-prison whereabouts or immediate plans.

On Tuesday, Manning took to social media to post a couple of images after her release:

Here's to freedom and a new beginning. . . #ChelseaIsFree

A post shared by Chelsea E. Manning (@xychelsea87) on

First steps of freedom!! 😄 . . #chelseaisfree

A post shared by Chelsea E. Manning (@xychelsea87) on

Manning, who was arrested in 2010, filed a transgender rights lawsuit in prison and attempted suicide twice last year, according to her lawyers.

Obama's decision to commute Manning's sentence to about seven years, including the time she spent locked up before being convicted, drew strong criticism from members of Congress and others, with Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan calling the move "just outrageous."

In a statement last week -- her first public comments since Obama intervened -- Manning thanked that former president and said that letters of support from veterans and fellow transgender people inspired her "to work toward making life better for others."

"For the first time, I can see a future for myself as Chelsea," she said. "I can imagine surviving and living as the person who I am and can finally be in the outside world. Freedom used to be something that I dreamed of but never allowed myself to fully imagine."

Her attorneys have said Manning was subjected to violence in prison and argued the military mistreated her by requiring her to serve her sentence in an all-male prison, restricting her physical and mental health care and not allowing her to keep a feminine haircut.

The Department of Defense has repeatedly declined to discuss Manning's treatment in prison.

Army officials on Tuesday said Manning will remain on active duty in a special status after her scheduled release from prison.

"Manning will remain on excess leave while the court-martial conviction is under appellate review," army spokeswoman, Lt. Col. Jennifer Johnson, said in a statement to CBS News.

In that status she will be unpaid, but will be legally entitled to military medical care.

"In an active-duty status, although in an unpaid status, Manning is eligible for direct care at medical treatment facilities, commissary privileges, morale welfare and recreation privileges, and exchange privileges," Johnson said in a written statement.